Apr 13 2022

Eat This for Eggs-Ceptional Oral Health

carton of brown eggs with funny faces drawn on

Easter season is imminent! This means it’s a time for annual traditions, family time, and more. Indeed, it’s fine to indulge in chocolate or candy-filled eggs in moderation when paired with proper oral hygiene. 

However, the humble chicken egg is a superfood filled with vitamins, antioxidants, and nutrients. Whether you like your eggs fried, deviled, or scrambled, Dr. Matt cracks down six justifications for why eggs are an exceptional choice all year long.

Protein

While it’s crucial to consume an adequate amount of protein in your diet, it’s equally important to ensure that you are fueling with the correct type of protein. Eggs are a complete protein, containing nine essential amino acids that the human body needs to survive. 

For example, proteins are required in the body to help build and repair damaged or worn down tissues and muscles. This includes the connective tissues and our mouths, such as the tongue, the jaw muscles, and gums.

Phosphorus

Furthermore, protein (especially animal-based protein) contains a remarkable mineral called phosphorus. When combined with calcium and vitamin D, phosphorus plays a vital role in strengthening the teeth and bones.

Selenium

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, one to two eggs every morning can help your child reach their recommended dietary allowance for selenium. Even in small amounts, selenium supports many bodily processes. Also, an increase in this potent antioxidant has been linked to a decrease in cavities in children and young adults.

Calcium

Calcium is one of the most abundant minerals in the human body, and 99% of our body’s total calcium is stored in the bones and teeth. Specifically, calcium is responsible for: 

  • Strengthening enamel (the protective outer shell of our teeth)
  • Preventing dental decay
  • Stabilizing the jaw bone, which keeps our teeth in place

Ideally, people should consume at least 1,000 mg of calcium daily, and eggs are a wonderful non-dairy source of calcium. The more calcium you consume, the stronger your teeth and bones will get. Likely, this translates to fewer cavities, less tooth damage, and other horrible dental issues.

Conversely, if a person does not get enough calcium in their diet, dental problems may occur, such as:

  • Gingivitis and periodontal disease
  • Brittle teeth
  • Tooth decay

Vitamin B-12

Whole eggs are rich in vitamin B-12. Also known as cobalamin, vitamin-B-12 aids in red blood cell formation and cell metabolism. Regrettably, cobalamin deficiency can deteriorate oral health. B-12 deficiency has been coupled with various manifestations, including abnormal tongue and gum tissue.

Iron

Did you know that eggs are a great source of iron? Each egg contains 1.89 mg of iron, which helps keep the teeth and gums in tip-top shape.

However, when the body does not get enough iron, a person may develop anemia. Unfortunately, people who suffer from anemia are more prone to tooth decay and gum disease.

Is it time to book your child’s next dental appointment? If so, hop to it.

This weekend, let the Easter egg hunts commence! But don’t forget to indulge in your hard work by sitting down and cracking open a few eggs for a tooth-healthy treat. 

Contact our Overland Park, KS office if it’s time to schedule your child’s next kid’s dental appointment. Call us at (913) 685-9990, or send us a message online.

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